Toro 60V 16 Inch Cordless Chainsaw 51850 Review

PTR Review
  • Overall Rating 8.8

Overall, the Toro 60V cordless chainsaw's feel and performance are a step above what we would label as an entry-level or pure DIY product, but not quite where the top performers are. It's also not as expensive as the top dogs. It's an excellent option to have on hand for your storm cleanup, seasonal prep, heavy trimming, and light to medium diameter felling jobs.

Overall Score 8.8 (out of 10)

Toro 60V Cordless Chainsaw Is Ready for Storm Season

More and more, Pros and serious DIYers are turning to battery power for landscaping and yard work simply due to the ease of use. While it may not suit everyone’s needs, the Toro 60V cordless chainsaw lets you skip the maintenance of gas in exchange for cordless convenience.

Pros

  • On board wrench storage
  • Captured bar nuts
  • Large oil resevour
  • Dual bar studs
  • Metal bucking spikes

Cons

  • Doesn’t include a case

Toro 60V Cordless Chainsaw Performance

When our friend Eli Mosley  called us up with some tree work to do, it was the perfect opportunity to see how well the Toro 60V cordless chainsaw stands up against other cordless chainsaws we’ve tested. We had some medium-sized pines to fell which gave us a chance to put its 16-inch bar and chain through its paces.

This saw definitely held its own right out of the gate during our testing. With its 0.043-inch chain, it quickly tore through 8-inch pine tree trunks as you’d expect for softwood species. Once the tree was down, we got to work limbing and breaking down the trunk.

The smaller 3 to 4-inch branches were no issue at all, however, the thicker cuts started to put some strain on the saw. We had to take some pressure off to allow the brushless motor to keep its RPMs up, but it was able to keep the teeth cutting all the way through. Compared to top models from EGO , Greenworks , and Ryobi , it cut a little more sluggishly but is still ahead of what we expect from entry-level options.

Runtime

Nailing down an exact runtime is always a challenge with chainsaws since branches vary in diameter and different species have different densities. During our testing with a 2.0Ah battery, we were also to process the majority of a 30-foot pine tree but couldn’t quite finish the job. We’d say that if you’re going to use the saw for an extended period of time then you should have some spare batteries on hand, just in case.


You can also use a higher-capacity battery, of course. However, we prefer the lighter weight of smaller packs and cycling a couple of those on the charger.

Toro 60V Cordless Chainsaw Design Notes

Weight And Balance

Without the battery, the saw weighs 10 lbs, 2 oz, including the bar, chain, and oil. Using the 2.0Ah pack from the kit, it’s 13 lbs, 3 oz.

Toro’s top-load battery bay contributes well to the overall balance and feel of this cordless chainsaw. This style gives it a more traditional look and keeps the weight centered the same way a gas engine would. The battery has a convenient top handle that makes inserting and removing batteries a breeze, even if you’re wearing thick work gloves.

Pro-Style Chain Tensioning

The bar secures with dual studs whose nuts require a wrench to tighten and loosen. Some of the saws in this class have a tool-free adjustment, but the benefit remains a source of contention. Some Pros consider the dual stud design to maintain a more secure connection despite trading off some convenience.

However, dropping bar nuts is common especially if you’re wearing work gloves. Toro designed this saw with captive nuts that are tougher to lose in the field so that’s definitely a major plus.

Another huge advantage is the onboard scrench storage. It’s embarrassing to admit how many of these dang things I’ve lost over the years. The scrench stows away in the base of the main handle and stays out of sight until you need it next time.

Bucking Spikes

The metal bucking spikes on this 16-inch cordless chainsaw are a little on the small and blunt side. That’s not an outright negative as this does allow you to get a little closer to the log when making cuts and take advantage of the full bar length.

The spike ends are somewhat rounder than what you expect from a “spike”. Regardless, they do offer a decent amount of grip when you’re cutting.

Chain and Bar

Like many saws in this class, Toro pairs a 0.043-inch, 3/8-inch pitch chain with the saw’s 16-inch bar. It’s a standard configuration that’s easy to get replacements for when the time comes.

Additional Features

  • Automatic chain oiler
  • Chain brake

Toro 60V Cordless Chainsaw Price

The Toro 60V cordless chainsaw is available as a bare tool and with a couple of kit options. As a bare tool, expect to pay $219.99 at your local Toro dealer. For $249.99 you’ll get a single 2.0Ah battery and 1 amp 60V Max charger. If you want a little more capacity, there is a kit that includes a single 2.5Ah battery as well as a 2 amp charger for $279.99. All three options carry a 3-year full tool warranty and the batteries hold a full 3-year warranty.

The Bottom Line

Overall, the Toro 60V cordless chainsaw’s feel and performance are a step above what we would label as an entry-level or pure DIY product, but not quite where the top performers are. It’s also not as expensive as the top dogs. It’s an excellent option to have on hand for your storm cleanup, seasonal prep, heavy trimming, and light to medium diameter felling jobs.

Toro 60V Cordless Chainsaw Specifications

  • Model: Toro 51850
  • Power Source: Toro 60V Max Battery
  • Chain Pitch: .325 in.
  • Chain Gauge: .043
  • Bar Length: 16 in.
  • Length: 34 in.
  • Top Speed: 36 fps
  • Warranty: 3-year tool warranty, 3-year battery warranty
  • Price: $219.99 (bare), $249.99 (with 2.0Ah battery and charger), $279.99 (with 2.5Ah battery and charger)

Related articles

Toro Acquires Intimidator Group, Manufacturer of Spartan Mowers

Toro Acquisition Expands Position in Zero Turn and UTV Markets The Toro Company (NYSE: TTC) recently announced the acquisition of the privately-held Intimidator Group, based out of Batesville, Arkansas. The Intimidator Group designs and manufactures outdoor power equipment and side-by-side utility vehicles. They make these tools for the Intimidator, Envy, Bad Dawg, and Ground Hawg […]

Subscribe
Notify of
guest
0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
0
Would love your thoughts, please comment.x
()
x